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#11 2019-05-23 16:51:33

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,193
Website

Re: Low-Tech Magazine, now solar-powered!

jakob wrote #318186:

I reckon yours is pretty good: as it says « C’est tout bon ! ». I hope you’re reading it right: lower is better!

Yes, ‘c’est bon’ in all categories but the ‘environmental’ category. :{

I am ranked 2,460th out of 17,061 sites evaluated. I can do better! :}

While the dithered effect is refreshingly down to earth (and on-topic for the low-tech site) in the sea of high-gloss imagery, it’s not really thaaat practical for most people.

I like the effect, but agree it’s not ideal for all situations. I could compress though, and I haven’t done that yet. There’s a nice compression client for Mac I discovered. I have to find that now, come to think of it. Oh, here, the one mentioned in the article, in fact: Image Optim.

I will only ever link to videos, never embed them. I hope that’s a difference.

etc wrote #318187:

I don’t think CMS are sole responsible — how you use them accounts too. For example, flat-file Grav homepage scores very badly (13928 / 17063), probably because of a crazy number of pictures. Client-side Javascript can have a large impact too.

Yeah, I’m not saying it’s the sole factor. But in the discussion about this, there’s a big emphasis on static site generators being better. People talk about this all – the time in M’don. I don’t know if there is or how much, and I’m not about to benchmark it, but based on all the yabba-dabba-doo about it, there seems to be a difference.

I don’t think so, unless you avoid starting PHP server at all, but then txp can not run neither.

Okay. So there’s no impetus for the flat-file approach on the energy point, at least.


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

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#12 2019-05-23 17:37:39

jakob
Admin
From: Germany
Registered: 2005-01-20
Posts: 3,423
Website

Re: Low-Tech Magazine, now solar-powered!

Destry wrote #318188:

Yes, ‘c’est bon’ in all categories but the ‘environmental’ category. :{

I am ranked 2,460th out of 17,061 sites evaluated. I can do better! :}

As I understand it, your site is in the top 15%, i.e. 14601 are ‘worse’ than you. But maybe I am reading that incorrectly.

There’s a nice compression client for Mac I discovered. I have to find that now, come to think of it. Oh, here, the one mentioned in the article, in fact: ImageOptim.

Yes, it’s effective and free. One thing worth noting there: if you have images with correct copyright attribution in the metadata, the standard setting in ImageOptim strips that out. You can set it not to do that in the settings. (It doesn’t do that dithering, though).

There is a very detailed article on the Google Pagespeed site on the different compression approaches which can go further than ImageOptim does.

I will only ever link to videos, never embed them. I hope that’s a difference.

If you still want the visual aspect of videos, show the preview image but not the video until it’s clicked on (as discussed on the forum elsewhere). Or make the video show in a modal that loads only when clicked on.

Static site generators …

If the end result is simply a collection of html files with linked assets – which is what the principle is supposed to be – then your server only needs to serve static content and you don’t need a database or php at all. You’ll lose any dynamic capability, such as filtering or searching – making it unsuitable for lots of sites – and of course you need to recompile your site (or at least the affected pages) whenever you make updates to your site.

I’m not saying it’s the sole factor …

Like in building construction, it’s probably worth trying to gauge the relative effect of different factors. Some things have a big impact and others you can tweak and optimise ad infinitum but the overall effect is negligible by comparison.

I don’t know much about this, but by way of example, you could spend ages optimising the last bytes out of every image to reduce server retention but at the same time are using a CDN that replicates your entire site across the globe multiple times even though most of your readers are local and there’s little need for that CDN server in Singapore or Australia. In that case, switching off a CDN may be far more effective.
Then again, for large and complex sites, a cache / CDN may reduce server load significantly and – I’m guessing wildly here – there may be a payoff point where the energy cost of redundant duplicate data retention is less than the energy cost of renewed page processing. I’m sure people have looked into this, just as they have for building construction.


TXP Builders – finely-crafted code, design and txp

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#13 2019-05-23 18:01:31

etc
Developer
Registered: 2010-11-11
Posts: 3,145
Website

Re: Low-Tech Magazine, now solar-powered!

Destry wrote #318188:

Yeah, I’m not saying it’s the sole factor. But in the discussion about this, there’s a big emphasis on static site generators being better. People talk about this all – the time in M’don.

They are better in generating static sites, which generally suffice for blogging, but lack advanced customize/search/etc features. Though this might be just the impression I get.

Okay. So there’s no impetus for the flat-file approach on the energy point, at least.

Well, if you are editing/serving, say, static js/css assets via txp, saving them as flat files is much better because they are then served directly, bypassing txp. But saving, say, a form with txp tags as flat file for importing it to txp from disk rather than db makes no sense, imo.


etc_[ query | search | pagination | date | tree | cache ]

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#14 2019-05-23 18:17:16

colak
Admin
From: Cyprus
Registered: 2004-11-20
Posts: 7,210
Website

Re: Low-Tech Magazine, now solar-powered!

Destry wrote #318183:

The Low-Tech mag article has been inspiring more work in similar directions. Good article here, Digital Guide to Low Tech.

Thanks for sharing this, it’s an interesting read!


Yiannis
——————————
neme.org | hblack.net | LABS | State Machines | Respbublika! | NeMe @ github

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#15 2019-05-23 20:04:57

etc
Developer
Registered: 2010-11-11
Posts: 3,145
Website

Re: Low-Tech Magazine, now solar-powered!

colak wrote #318191:

Thanks for sharing this, it’s an interesting read!

Ranked 5369ième sur 17066 pages :-)


etc_[ query | search | pagination | date | tree | cache ]

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#16 2019-05-24 09:40:34

gaekwad
Admin
From: People's Republic of Cornwall
Registered: 2005-11-19
Posts: 2,472

Re: Low-Tech Magazine, now solar-powered!

Destry wrote #318185:

I also need to check with my host if they are running renewable. I don’t think they are. This seems to be a key factor in the calculations. Will probably make a change again when the year paid runs out.

I’ve worked with Permaculture magazine in the past. One of their tech folks (not me) did some research into green/renewable hosting and ended up choosing Hetzner. It’s a bit dated now — a lot has happened since — but might be worth a skim.

I wonder, though, is there an energy difference between a regular run of Txp versus the new Txp flatfile rig? If files are flat on server, isn’t there less web server calls? Dumb question? ;)

From my DIY approach/viewpoint, you can get some wins if you’re careful, but it’ll involve a lot of time if you want to truly minimise your footprint. You can home-host on a single board computer if your ISP allows the traffic, but you’re unlikely to be able to influence the footprint of the backhaul telecom equipment.

If you rent space on shared/managed hosting, you’re paying for infrastructure, staff, etc. A lot (many or most) of these organisations work on economies of scale. Some oversell their capacity, and end up with busy servers. You could argue a busy server is better than a quiet server since it’s working all the time for a lot of people.

A high density Blade-esque server might take 10U on a rack with a 3000W power supply. When you’re at this level of computing, efficiency and quality of power delivery becomes far more important. 85% to 95% efficiency is doable with Gold and Platinum-grade power supplies. This same server can potentially server hundreds or thousands of clients, typically a lot of mom-‘n-pop-shop clients get hosted on these servers because they’re comparatively set and forget. Less of a risk of over-provisioning when you know these sites won’t get changed often.

Purely on a Watts level, a computer will typically use more power when it does more work. So, it’s not a stretch to want to use more efficient software with a view to using fewer system resources overall. Anything that can get a higher density of clients on a server without affecting quality of service for the web host, the webmeister or the site users is — generally — a good thing, in my book.

I rabbit on about Nginx because of its low resource footprint. I’m the same about Textpattern. I installed a couple of development Wordpress instances yesterday and I was reminded about another (former) client who had a Wordpress-based site for a London organisation dealing with lots of graphic files (JPG, PNG, not porn). Their own site hosting had to be bumped up spec-wise numerous tiers because there was no image optimisation, no visibility of the plethora of plugins they had deployed, no care given to thinking about the experience of the viewing public. A front page load was 25MB…which on an office DSL connection is fine, but other’s mileage will vary. One of their plugins was (presumably unintentionally) creating a thumbnail of an image for every hit on every image of a given category, something about server-side caching I think, but this ended up creating hundreds of thousands of files in a messy tree deep inside the file system…and this then exhausted the inodes on the filesystem…and their solution was to throw more storage at the problem (with accompanying inodes) rather than investigate why. It was likely more expensive to have someone found out why than to tack on another terabyte of storage.

One thing that does focus the mind is web hosting that charges you based on storage used, database queries and Ingress/egress — AWS comes to mind — for some sites it becomes a game to see how cheap you can get it!

Aside: the Textpattern servers on DigitalOcean have pretty efficient (IMHO) software builds, and a nod toward monitoring metrics, so we can see areas of improvement pretty easily. When the forum is moved over (next week, all being well) we’ll have a good baseline on which to improve things further, hosting-wise at least.

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#17 2019-05-27 12:00:41

Destry
Moderator
From: Haut-Rhin
Registered: 2004-08-04
Posts: 4,193
Website

Re: Low-Tech Magazine, now solar-powered!

Thanks, Pete! Insightful.

I wasn’t aware of Permaculture Mag. Looks good.


The text persuades, the *notes prove。

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#18 2019-05-27 12:59:28

jakob
Admin
From: Germany
Registered: 2005-01-20
Posts: 3,423
Website

Re: Low-Tech Magazine, now solar-powered!

More fundamental and practical tips on designing for actual performance and at the same time reducing server load.


TXP Builders – finely-crafted code, design and txp

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#19 2019-05-27 13:03:29

jakob
Admin
From: Germany
Registered: 2005-01-20
Posts: 3,423
Website

Re: Low-Tech Magazine, now solar-powered!

gaekwad wrote #318197:

A front page load was 25MB…which on an office DSL connection is fine…

*gasp*!

One of their plugins was (presumably unintentionally) creating a thumbnail of an image for every hit on every image of a given category, something about server-side caching I think, but this ended up creating hundreds of thousands of files in a messy tree deep inside the file system…

*gasp* again! Sometimes that can happen with Wordpress if you try out lots of themes where each theme registers their own sets of thumbnails sizes.


TXP Builders – finely-crafted code, design and txp

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#20 2019-05-28 05:21:54

colak
Admin
From: Cyprus
Registered: 2004-11-20
Posts: 7,210
Website

Re: Low-Tech Magazine, now solar-powered!

A list of green hosting providers might be of interest.


Yiannis
——————————
neme.org | hblack.net | LABS | State Machines | Respbublika! | NeMe @ github

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