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#13 2008-06-30 13:42:36

Bloke
Developer
From: Leeds, UK
Registered: 2006-01-29
Posts: 10,627
Website GitHub

Re: [mention] Jon Hicks compares EE with TXP

Hehehe, I want to like XSLT it’s just that, well… ummm… I think my programmers’ Babelfish is broken.

It’s bust for Rails and MVC as well, which is a bit of a git. Must upgrade it one day.


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#14 2008-06-30 16:11:09

hcgtv
Plugin Author
From: Miami, Florida
Registered: 2005-11-29
Posts: 2,721
Website

Re: [mention] Jon Hicks compares EE with TXP

thebombsite wrote:

I also agree with the comments over at Symphony about EE being bloated. I think after trying it out for a bit that it’s not something I would use by choice though it does have a large feature set.

When EE 1.0 stable came out, I liked it, having used pMachine in the past. Then over time, all these features started to creep in, then it quickly became a bit bloated for my tastes. Which is why I don’t understand how people give it such high praise, given that all that bloat amounts to slow performance of your sites at times. Yes caching can help out, but what’s the point of a dynamic site if you take the dynamicness out of it?

Now we hear that EE 2.0 will address all these issues, the admin is easier to navigate, an award winning designer was hired to help out, yadda, yadda, yadda. In the end, no matter what pretty face you put on the backend, the frontend has to perform.

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#15 2008-06-30 18:00:22

maverick
Member
From: Southeastern Michigan, USA
Registered: 2005-01-14
Posts: 975
Website

Re: [mention] Jon Hicks compares EE with TXP

re: EE

Like Bert, I used pMachine, and was positive about EE when it first came out.

I recommended it to a friend a couple of years ago, who likes it a lot. It offered some features out of the box he wanted. I have one personal site I use it for, just to stay up on it.

Overall, I think its one of the nicer CMSes out there. If Txp didn’t exist, it’d probably be my first choice at the moment, with ModxCMS and Symphony in the running. It has things I don’t like, and it doesn’t “click” for me like Txp does. But that’s me. It has different goals than Txp, and it shows in how it is designed and how it performs. That’s okay.

re: XSLT/Symphony

I’m trying to like XSLT. It’s just a bit slow going wrapping my head around it. I took a break from trying to understand Symphony and this time around I am getting it a bit more.

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#16 2008-06-30 22:05:39

iblastoff
Plugin Author
From: Toronto
Registered: 2006-06-11
Posts: 1,197
Website

Re: [mention] Jon Hicks compares EE with TXP

hakjoon wrote:

I guess I’m the only one that actually likes XSLT. It’s a big selling point for symphony for me, because it’s a standard, you can use it on any platform, any programming language even on the client through javascript.

honestly i think if one were to take web design/coding seriously, after html and css, XSLT is probably going to be the future in webpage document templating. its all fine and dandy when TXP and EE use their own little sets of xml-styled tags but in the end, you’re probably way better off learning an actual language that, as hakjoon pointed out, is a multi-platform standard.

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#17 2008-06-30 22:19:36

Bloke
Developer
From: Leeds, UK
Registered: 2006-01-29
Posts: 10,627
Website GitHub

Re: [mention] Jon Hicks compares EE with TXP

iblastoff wrote:

after html and css, XSLT is probably going to be the future in webpage document templating. its all fine and dandy when TXP and EE use their own little sets of xml-styled tags but in the end, you’re probably way better off learning an actual language

I’m a bit confused/thick in this regard so excuse my ignorance. I thought XSLT transformed one XML doc into another via sorting and searching and filtering and stuff? Surely one needs a system of generating a well-formed XML doc in the first place? i.e. some tag system… or a DTD at least? Perhaps I’m missing the point, which might explain why I don’t “get it”.

And XSLT still looks like it’s written by coders. Probably ok for you (and me, eventually, when my decoder ring/brain switches on) but I’d guess quite a few designers would be put off by the syntax compared with the little TXP tags. Just a guess.

Last edited by Bloke (2008-06-30 22:20:27)


The smd plugin menagerie — for when you need one more gribble of power from Textpattern. Bleeding-edge code available on GitHub.

Txp Builders – finely-crafted code, design and Txp

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